2807, 2016

Stewardship: Bible lesson series

By |July 28th, 2016|CEF Ministry, illustration: Bible lessons|0 Comments

An illustration from today…
CEF flashcard Bible lesson series on Stewardship.

I was trying to make use of the light and shadows to help show the heart attitude in their giving; the one giving for others to see.

The wealthy and widow giving in the Temple.

The wealthy and widow giving in the Temple.

Flashcard print size: 24.5 x 34cm.  Tools: Adobe Photoshop CC, Wacom Cintiq
Copyright 2016©, Child Evangelism Fellowship®
Do not use or reproduce.

905, 2016

Graduation Day for Rebecca

By |May 9th, 2016|Family News, Personal, Photography|0 Comments

A big congratulations to Rebecca! A day full of smiles.
…followed by tears when Sue & I had to leave on Sunday.

Jumping between weddings, graduations, greetings and farewells  …whew! what an emotional roller coaster these past few weeks in the US have been for us.

Graduation_Becca_2016

A sunny, windy day in Greenville, SC with plenty of smiles to go around.

A sunny, windy day in Greenville, SC with plenty of smiles to go around.

 

Friends from school

Friends from school

2504, 2016

Wedding Day

By |April 25th, 2016|Family News, Personal, Photography|3 Comments

Yesterday was a great day for a country wedding!

I’ve included a few photos from our daughter Sarah’s marriage to Craig Damron.

Feeling relaxed while waiting for the service to begin.

Feeling relaxed while waiting for the service to begin.

 

Craig stopping by the wedding "command center" (kitchen/supply room).

Craig stopping by the wedding “command center” (kitchen/supply room).

 

Wedding_Sarah-37

Heading outside for photos.

 

Someone picked a few wild flowers for Sarah.

Someone picked a few wild flowers for Sarah.

 

The happy couple.

The happy couple.

 

Included a little touch of home.... Packed our suitcase with Swiss chocolate for making the hearts on the cupcakes.

Included a little touch of home…. Packed our suitcase with Swiss chocolate for making the hearts on the cupcakes.

 

Three sisters.

Three sisters.

 

There were several country fair games at the reception.

There were several country fair games at the reception.

Wedding_Sarah-434

 

Bouquet toss.

Bouquet toss.

 

Who needs a limo when you can exit in style – by fire truck.

Who needs a limo when you can exit in style – by fire truck.

 

Craig's friends at the Ashburn fire dept pulled in with a huge fire truck and lights flashing.

Craig’s friends at the Ashburn fire dept pulled in with a huge fire truck and lights flashing.

 

Wedding_Sarah-447

The church.

 

Mom & Dad

Mom & Dad

 

[Photos: Fujifilm X-T1, XF35mm, f/2; LR]

101, 2016

Return visits – Seen in a different light

By |January 1st, 2016|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

Interior of the Münster – Basel, Switzerland. Late afternoon in December.

Interior of the Münster – Basel, Switzerland. Late afternoon in December. [Fuji X-T1, bracketed images merged in Adobe Lightroom]

Without light, we wouldn’t have photography …or life!

As a photographer, always be aware of what the light is doing – the direction, quality, characteristics, how it falls on the subject, what it reveals, what it hides, surface textures created, shapes formed from shadows, color temperature, etc..  The same subject or location will be totally transformed under different light.

Tourists and visitors may have time constraints or limited to a single visit of a location, but if you’re a local or have a flexible schedule, visit a location and view it under different light (time of day and season) –you will be rewarded!

After several visits to the Münster church in Basel, I learned where the light would be in order to illuminate the stained glass windows on a particular side and create a warm glow.  I’ve taken many photos of the church interior, at times showing cold stone and lifeless windows from indirect sunlight, but what I particularly love about the above photo is the scene bathed in inviting warm light, the beam of light striking the pews, the radiant stained glass behind the organ pipes, and the colorful stained glass projected onto the opposite wall (center-right).  The entire scene was transformed and brought to life.

Other parts of the church were darkened.  For example, the windows below were photographed in the summer with the sun overhead, equally illuminating all the windows, something not possible when the above image was taken late afternoon in December.  [Hindsight, I should have taken several bracketed shots to avoid the over-exposed windows on either side.]

Mid-afternoon sun from overhead, illuminating all the ceiling windows.

Mid-afternoon sun from overhead, illuminating all the ceiling windows. [Nikon D70s]

Don’t become so focused on a subject/location that you forget to stop, observe and think about the light. When possible, return to familiar places and rediscover them – transformed in a different light.

2412, 2015

DIY table top backdrop

By |December 24th, 2015|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

chocolate_pretzels-69

Made yummy chocolate covered pretzels today.
——–
Have a Blessed Christmas.
——–
My DIY project – photo backdrop:
The table top boards are made from discarded Kilchzimmer barn roof scraps (est. 150-350 yrs. old), stained with coffee and tea.  A vinegar/steel-wool mixture was brushed over to add surface aging, which should have been made stronger to turn it grey. The surface was finished off with coconut fat. The other side is stained white so I’d have two table top options.
1912, 2015

Bad weather photos

By |December 19th, 2015|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

We had an early morning errand today. This was the amazing view waiting us on the mountain as we descended back into the valley. You can barely see an outline of the Swiss alps on the horizon. The fog was literally rolling and flowing like ocean waves.
This is one time when “hazy” isn’t so bad.
Have your camera on hand … whatever the weather.

[Fuji X-T1, XF 18-55mm, 1/4,000 sec, f/7]

[Fuji X-T1, XF 18-55mm, 1/4,000 sec, f/7]

1611, 2015

Stewardship: 5-part Bible lesson series

By |November 16th, 2015|CEF Ministry, illustration: Bible lessons|0 Comments

Below are several illustrations I recently completed from the first lesson in a new 5-part Bible lesson series on the theme of Stewardship.  The title of lesson one is Let’s appreciate and care for God’s wonderful creation.

Flashcard print size: 24.5 x 34cm.  Tools: Adobe Photoshop CC, Wacom Cintiq

5-part Bible lesson series on Stewardship, lesson 1 – Let's appreciate and care for God's wonderful creation.   Picture 1-1 : God creates the world trees and plants.

Picture 1-1 : God creates the world; trees and plants.

 

5-part Bible lesson series on Stewardship, lesson 1 – Let's appreciate and care for God's wonderful creation.   Picture 1-4 : Examples of God's wonderful creation – bees and swallows.

Picture 1-4 : Examples of God’s wonderful creation – bees and swallows.

 

5-part Bible lesson series on Stewardship, lesson 1 – Let's appreciate and care for God's wonderful creation.   Picture 1-5 : Because of sin, Adam and Eve are driven out of the garden. After that, weeds and thorns grew up and sickness and death came into the world.

Picture 1-5 : Because of sin, Adam and Eve are driven out of the garden. After that, weeds and thorns grew up and sickness and death came into the world.

211, 2015

November weather

By |November 2nd, 2015|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

Much of November is spent living in constant fog… but it’s not so bad if you can get above the murky soup!
This is the view (NE) arriving at work this morning at 8am. Kilchzimmer is a 600m walk down the Mt. behind where I’m standing. It’s no surprise this ridge is a popular spot for photographers to congregate in the early morning when the weather conditions are right.

I’m always ready with the tripod stored in the car (except today!).  The tripod would have allowed me to capture long exposures of the cloud flow over the mt..  …next time.  The odd cloud on the right is from a nearby nuclear plant.

Belchenfluh_fog_11_2_2015_HDR_a

Comparing this to the previous image, you will notice how a telephoto lens will compress (flatten) depth, enlarging subjects in the background.  In the previous image, the distant farm (right side) is much smaller in relation to the yellow trees in the foreground.

Comparing this to the previous image, you will notice how a telephoto lens will compress (flatten) depth, enlarging subjects in the background. In the previous image, the distant farm (right side) is much smaller in relation to the yellow trees in the foreground.

[Tech notes: Final images were created from three bracketed photos – over and under exposed images merged together to capture the wide dynamic range of the sky/clouds with dark foreground.  Fuji X-T1, edited in LR]

410, 2015

Worldwide Photowalk

By |October 4th, 2015|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

Enjoyed a Saturday afternoon attending the Worldwide Photowalk in Zürich, Switzerland.

Unfortunately, I arrived late due to terrible traffic but I knew their general route through the city so spent part of the day tracking down anyone with a camera.  I eventually found time to get a few photos in.

Worldwide Photowalk, Zurich

photo_walk_Zurich-7

photo_walk_Zurich-8

photo_walk_Zurich-1

2909, 2015

New barn roof at Kilchzimmer

By |September 29th, 2015|CEF Ministry, Kilchzimmer news, Personal, Photography, Photography|0 Comments

A team of CEF workers came to replace the roof on an old barn at Kilchzimmer.

Renovating the roof on an old barn at our office (Langenbruck, Switzerland) and finding clay roof tiles dating back to 1648 – one with a 369 yr. old hand imprint on the back. What a find! I looked up through the rafters with camera in hand and got all excited. No posing or "Photoshop" filters added here – just waited for our co-worker to make an interesting 'shape' with his hammer/tape measure, exposed for the blue sky to create a black silhouette and the back lit evening sun rim light. Feels good when the pieces come together like this. :-) [Fuji X-T1, XF 55-200mm lens]

I looked up through the rafters with camera in hand and got all excited. No posing or Photoshop filters added here – just waited for our co-worker to make an interesting ‘shape’ with his hammer/tape measure, exposed for the blue sky to create a black silhouette and the back lit evening sun rim light. Feels good when the pieces of a photo come together like this. 🙂

 Renovating the roof on an old barn at our office (Langenbruck, Switzerland) and finding clay roof tiles dating back to 1648 – one with a 369 yr. old hand imprint on the back. What a find! I looked up through the rafters with camera in hand and got all excited. No posing or "Photoshop" filters added here – just waited for our co-worker to make an interesting 'shape' with his hammer/tape measure, exposed for the blue sky to create a black silhouette and the back lit evening sun rim light. Feels good when the pieces come together like this. :-) [Fuji X-T1, XF 55-200mm lens]

2809, 2015

Camera nearby

By |September 28th, 2015|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

I’ve made a point to take my camera along with me wherever I go (when possible).  We never know when a photo opportunity will present itself.  Here are just a few of my favorites from the past few weeks.

Zurich-Coffee Festival-32

Waiting for evening train out of Zürich.

 

BCF_retreat_Adelboden_9-2015-70

Day hike near Adelboden (TschentenAlp, 6,630ft/2,020m). View south toward Steghorn (left-center).

 

wild flowers

Wild flowers in fields around Holderbank.

 

Spring 4_2015_around town-1

Evening hike around our village of Holderbank. Peaking over the ridge to view Alps in distance.

 

Kilchzimmer-28

Storm on the horizon. Kilchzimmer, Langenbruck, Switzerland.

 

humingbird moth_lavendar-5

Hummingbird moth in Lavendar. Kilchzimmer (Langenbruck, Switzerland)

 

Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

 

Lavertezzo. Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

Lavertezzo. Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

 

Super clear water where it can get up to 20-30m deep. There are several places one can dive from the rocks. Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

Super clear water where it can get up to 20-30m deep. There are several places one can dive from the rocks.
Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

 

Verzasca valley, Ticino region, Switzerland

Lavertezzo, Switzerland, Verzasca valley, Ticino region.



604, 2015

Visual Storytelling App from Adobe

By |April 6th, 2015|CEF Ministry|0 Comments

Ricketts_Glen_State_Park_900px-20

Ricketts Glen State Park. Benton, PA

One common link between my illustration, photography and multimedia work is they all involve different forms of visual storytelling so I’m always keeping an eye out for new and effective ways to create and share these stories.

This past week, I discovered an interesting way to share visual stories using a new iPad/iPhone app from Adobe, called Adobe Slate. While it’s useful to have programs that give you total control over the creative process with unlimited options and customization, there is definitely a place for simple straight forward apps that produce high quality presentations in few minutes instead of several hours.

I downloaded Adobe Slate App (free) and gave it a trial run.   It takes about 5 min. to become familiar with the app.  While being a new release with some rough edges and room to grow, I love the speed and simplicity.   I accessed my photos from a visit to Ricketts Glen State Park (Benton, PA).  The photos were on my iPad and a few sitting in my Dropbox. Within 15 min. I had a finished presentation I could share with others.

[Link to Adobe Slate presentation]

This is not just another PowerPoint style presentation app.  It creates a full-screen, seamless, continuous (vertical) scroll of still images and text.  Visual storytelling at the viewer’s own pace.  Adobe has another similar App (Adobe Voice) that allows for the addition of audio and made to export as a video.

Pros:

  • Very easy to learn in a few minutes.  No tutorials needed.
  • Several design templates to choose from which will give a unified look to your presentation. The templates set the font, color and make subtle adjustments to the basic photo transitions.
  • It’s free with several in-app purchases.  At time of this writing the in-app purchases were not yet available.
  • Photos can be imported into your iPad/iPhone from a wide variety of sources (Lightroom, Dropbox, directly from iPhone/iPad, Creative Cloud).
  • The project is saved on the Adobe Cloud (free storage space) and can be shared directly to Facebook, Twitter, email, html coding to embed in website, etc.
  • Can be viewed by anyone with an Internet connection.  No special app or software needed.

Cons:

  • Can’t create paragraphs for text.
  • A few minor limitations on framing/cropping of imported images and how they are viewed between vertical and horizontal format. Not a big deal.

I expect many of the app’s shortcomings to be addressed with future updates.  Will wait and see.  I’m guessing that the in-app purchases will be additional design themes to choose from or extra features.

I’m already thinking of many ways I could make use of this app, for those times when I may only have a few minutes to spare and need to produce professional looking results, quick and easy.  I like that!

1902, 2015

In search of a Christmas card photo

By |February 19th, 2015|CEF Ministry, Personal, Photography, Photography|0 Comments

View toward Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog to clear.

View toward Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog to clear.

It’s only February and we’re already planning ahead for Kilchzimmer’s next Christmas card because when the time comes to print the card (Oct.) we don’t usually have snow at Kilchzimmer.

There are challenges to getting a photo of Kilchzimmer in great light (morning or late afternoon), fresh snow on the ground, clear skies, and being available.

When we first moved to Switzerland, a Swiss told me that if I didn’t like the weather, wait five minutes – it’ll change!  Weather here is hard to predict.  So it’s no wonder that this morning was my third attempt at getting a good winter photo of Kilchzimmer from either the high vantage point of “Ankenballen”, or from the pasture on the opposite hillside.  The Ankenballen hike was treacherous with deep snow and a steep icy climb up rocks, so I didn’t want to risk slipping off the cliff again.

View towards Langenbruck, standing near the Kilchzimmer saddle.

View towards Langenbruck, standing near the Kilchzimmer saddle.

Today I went for the view from the hillside pasture with the advantage of having a path blazed through the drifts from my last photo excursion.  All this was a last minute decision, arriving at the office this morning dressed for sitting in a cozy building.

Pasture across from Kilchzimmer, waiting for sun to burn the fog away.

Pasture across from Kilchzimmer, waiting for sun to burn the fog away.

The fog hadn’t lifted but you could see the blue sky through the haze. That gave me an hour to hike and get in position.  The hoarfrost falls off the trees as soon as the sun cuts through the fog.

View of Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog level to drop.

View of Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog level to drop.

I had my gear set up and only had to wait a few more minutes for the dramatic shot – when the fog line would drop below Kilchzimmer.

View towards Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog to clear.

View towards Kilchzimmer and Ankenballen, waiting for fog to clear.

Suddenly waves of fog rolled in again.  My perseverance turned to stubbornness as I stood there for two hours waiting for the fog to drop into the valley.

I needed to take my mind off of freezing toes, so I occupied myself – even resorted to taking my very first “Selfie”!

My first "selfie".  What you do while waiting for the fog to clear and take your mind off of freezing feet.

My first “selfie”. What you do while waiting for the fog to clear and take your mind off of freezing feet.

I finally returned to the office with no winter photo of Kilchzimmer.  At least I got some much needed exercise, a few scenic photos, and a selfie!

Time to get psyched up for attempt #4 at a Kilchzimmer Christmas card photo – as soon as we get fresh snow, clear skies, and great light.

1202, 2015

Clouds are important (early reader book)

By |February 12th, 2015|CEF Ministry, illustration: Bible lessons, illustration: other|0 Comments

Noah sending out a raven.

Noah sending out a raven.

My favorite illustrator is NC Wyeth.  I love how he made use of clouds to lead the eye around the image and draw attention to certain subjects.  In this picture of Noah releasing the raven, I wanted the children to spot tiny Noah but also make sure they didn’t miss the Raven.  While the front of the boat is almost like a giant pointing finger, it also blocks the line of motion between Noah and the Raven.  The large bright cloud helps to draw attention to Noah but then lead the eye in the direction of the raven isolated against the blue sky.

While cloudless skies definitely have their place and purpose, carefully placed clouds can play an important role, not just to lead the eye but to add a dramatic touch or a splash of color for the children.

tools: Adobe Photoshop CS6, Wacom Cintiq 18sx

 

402, 2015

early-reader book: Noah’s ark

By |February 4th, 2015|CEF Ministry, illustration: Bible lessons, illustration: other|0 Comments

 

Noah's ark in storm.

Noah’s ark in storm.

Started illustrations for the Noah’s ark scenes in the early reader booklet.  I don’t normally get to paint a stormy sea so this was a big challenge to simplify a chaotic scene, involving several re-re-does.  There’s a reason art teachers drill in the importance of nailing down the values first, before adding color.  The b/w draft stage is where most of the problems are solved.

Normally, for an image like this where there is limited light, the entire scene would lean toward monochromatic with grey-blues/greens, including the boat.  I added more color because this will be for young children and it helps to have the boat stand out.  The final printed image in the book will only take up the top 1/4 of a page.

tools: Adobe Photoshop CS6, Wacom Cintiq 18sx

1911, 2014

Early-Reader book: adapting style

By |November 19th, 2014|CEF Ministry, illustration: Bible lessons, illustration: other|2 Comments

I remember in art class at university, a professor was giving a critique of a freshman’s drawing and the student responded, “…but that’s not my style.”  We all gave a silent gasp as the professor calmly but firmly replied, “You don’t have a style.”  That’s not my style” is sometimes used as an excuse by an artist to avoid stretching and learning outside of their comfort zone.  Our unique style isn’t necessarily something we go looking for.  It tends to naturally find us over time.  I’ve noticed that my style of illustration has slowly evolved over the past 30 yrs in CEF, being primarily shaped and influenced by the projects I’m given.

Time constraints can have a big influence on style choices.  I need to work quickly with limited time to refine illustrations as much as I’d like.  If there are 35+ illustrations to complete, I need to adapt my technique, tools and methods.  This involves some compromises.  For example, in the pre-digital years I loved working with oils on canvas but gouache was more practically suited to my work.  This switch greatly influenced my style.
A good illustrator is not simply someone who draws well – it’s someone who can draw well and do it quickly!

The purpose of the illustration will also influence our style choices and how to approach a project.  The majority of my projects are large flashcard books that will be shown by a teacher to groups of children and viewed from a distance. Each picture will be shown for 1-3 minutes so the children need to process the visual information quickly.  The target audience is usually 6-12 yr olds coming from a wide range of cultures around the world.  CEF believes it’s important that the illustration style conveys to the children that these Bible characters were real people who lived in real time and place.  The pictures should help hold the child’s attention and bring the story to life.

With this 32-page early reader book, I’m faced with some new challenges.  I need to adapt the illustrations for a younger audience.  The pictures will be viewed at arms length (or closer) at his own pace, exploring the image, and hopefully want to read/view again and again.  There needs to be enough detail to hold the child’s attention.

The basic story line is about two children who visit a farm with animals when it begins to rain and they go inside for a snack.  The farmer opens his Bible and shares the story of Noah, weaving in a clear presentation of the Gospel.

There will be large illustrations on each page along with small pictures/symbols corresponding with words throughout the simple, large print text.  For the large illustrations, I hope to create more stylized characters with simplified shapes while still conveying a realness to the scene.  “Simplified” may sound easier but it can actually be more difficult to execute … successfully.  This will be one of my most challenging and daunting projects in years as I’ll be working in a different style than I’m used to.

The booklet has a farm character that appears in the side margin separate from the story, to share helpful ideas for parents on how to reinforce the teaching with their child.  I’ve never animated a talking tractor before so this is definitely adapting to a style outside my comfort zone!

2810, 2014

Playing with my food

By |October 28th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

This past weekend I enjoyed a slice of my wife’s homemade apple pie, caramel sauce and homemade ice-cream with fresh cream from the local farmer.  One of my all-time favorite combos!

When time allows and doesn’t disrupt family meal time, an interesting plate of food can provide an opportunity to experiment with the camera.   I thought I’d have plenty of time to experiment with different lighting options but I soon discovered that food isn’t the most patient of subjects as it’s quick to melt, juices begin to run, etc.. I need to plan everything out ahead of time with composition, camera settings, lights and reflectors all in place.

With food, I usually bounce the flash off a white card/wall, use natural window light or use a shoot-through umbrella/soft box to give the effect of natural light from a window.  For the pie and ice-cream I decided to try something different by using a reflective umbrella for comparison.  When looking at the final images, I immediately noticed the detailed reflection of the umbrella’s metal frame in the caramel sauce.  Not good.  Actually taking the time to experiment with different qualities of light and lighting setups on the same subject is a valuable learning experience that sticks with you more than just reading it from a book or website.  Sometimes it’s ok to play with your food.

[Fuji X-T1, 18-55mm, manual flash in large reflective umbrella – positioned just off frame, above and behind subject]

homemade apple pie, homemade caramel and homemade ice-cream.

homemade apple pie, homemade caramel and homemade ice-cream.

 

Several days ago I saw these wonderful ripe red tomatoes in the kitchen. They looked sooo good! Unfortunately, my stomach doesn’t appreciate fresh cut tomatoes, so the best I could do was have fun photographing them.  With the tomatoes I had plenty of time to work the lights and try different angles.  I then poured carbonated water in the glass.  The glass was placed on a piece of A3 sized white paper curved up in the back to create a seamless BG – no cost, nothing fancy.  With placement of the light to the subject and controlling light spill, you can make the BG as white or black as you need.

Tomatoes in a wine glass

tomatoes in carbonated water

2710, 2014

First snowfall

By |October 27th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

I hung out the attic window to photograph our first snowfall of winter at the CEF office – Kilchzimmer (Langenbruck, Switzerland).
One of those times I fought the urge to stretch the black/white values in the histogram and decided to keep a narrow range of values.  Using a telephoto lens compressed the depth and layers of falling snow to give a natural grain to the image.  The scene already appeared monochromatic so it wasn’t a big step to convert to B/W.  I added a slight coolness to the B/W image by adding a split tone.
[Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, LR5]

First snowfall of winter. View from Kilchzimmer.  Langenbruck, Switzerland.

First snowfall of winter. View from Kilchzimmer. Langenbruck, Switzerland.

2710, 2014

Dahlia Field

By |October 27th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

For some “creative stretching” I’ve been taking the occasional square photo.  Square photos are not just for uploading to Instagram.
A beautiful field of Dahlias during one of our last warm days of the year – Liestal, Switzerland.

[Fujifilm X-T1, LR5]

Dahlia field in Liestal, Switzerland.

Dahlia field in Liestal, Switzerland.

 

 

610, 2014

View from Kilchzimmer

By |October 6th, 2014|Kilchzimmer news, Photography, Photography|1 Comment

This was the view from Kilchzimmer at 8:00am this morning after an overnight rain.  It makes for an encouraging start to the day when we can get above those dreary clouds in the valley.  If we get caught in early morning work traffic, that really means we got behind a tractor or the cows were crossing the road after milking.

View from CEF European Regional Office – "Kilchzimmer", in Langenbruck, Switzerland

View from CEF European Regional Office – “Kilchzimmer”, in Langenbruck, Switzerland

[Fuji X-T1, 18-55mm, LR]

1509, 2014

Stone Harbor, NJ

By |September 15th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

I learned a few lessons while photographing Sandpipers at the beach in Stone Harbor, NJ.
#1– Sandpipers are hyper birds that never stand still.
#2– Don’t forget to wear sunscreen.
The Fujifilm X-T1 was up to the challenge of catching the fast moving birds within the 55-200’s shallow DOF.

Sandpipers. [Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Sandpipers.
[Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Sandpipers. [Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Sandpipers.
[Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Sandpipers. [Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Sandpipers.
[Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Stone Harbor, NJ. [Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

Stone Harbor, NJ.
[Fujifilm X-T1, XF 55-200mm, edited in LR]

2308, 2014

Lancaster, PA – Central Market

By |August 23rd, 2014|Personal, Photography|3 Comments

I had the camera along in downtown Lancaster, PA and walked through the Central Market – the oldest operating farmers’ market in America.

A photographer friend and I had a free afternoon and did a short photo walk for some creative inspiration.  Contrary to the popular view that creativity thrives best without limitations, sometimes the best exercise to get the creative juices flowing is to work within strict limitations.  For example, choosing to only shoot with a single fixed focal length (35mm, 50mm, etc.) or just shoot b/w.

He appears angry but he was just having an animated conversation outside the Central Market.

He appears angry but he was just having an animated conversation outside the Central Market.

Fresh bread at farmers' market reminded me of the bread back in Switzerland.

Fresh bread at farmers’ market reminded me of the bread back in Switzerland.

Lunch break at the Farmers' Market.

Lunch break at the Farmers’ Market.

Downtown Lancaster, PA

Downtown Lancaster, PA

All images taken with Fuji X-T1 camera and edited in Adobe Lightroom.

2008, 2014

Mid-Coast Maine

By |August 20th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

We had a great weekend in Maine with meetings at a church near Rockport. We were able to fit in two days to explore the nearby towns and coastline.  A beautiful area to visit and photograph – rain or shine!

[All photos taken with the Fuji X-T1, 18-55mm, 55-200mm.  Edited in Adobe LR.]

Port Clyde lighthouse

Lighthouse near Port-Clyde, ME. (mid-coastal region)

Maine-2

Our host/friends served a wonderful breakfast with fresh picked wild Maine blueberries!

Climb to Bald Mt. (near Rockport)

Beginning of hike up to Bald Mt. (near Rockport, ME)

Sunset in Rockport

Sunset at Rockport harbor

Maine-9

Small inlet at Owls head, near Rockland harbor, ME

Lobster trap markers

Lobster trap markers. (Owl’s Head – Rockland, ME)

lobster cage ropes

Lobster cage ropes

Favorite destination for plein air painters.

Mid-coast region of Maine is a favourite destination for plein-air painters.

Shop in Camden.

A small shop in Camden, ME and a little touch of Italy with the Vespa parked out front.

You know your in Maine when the shoe racks are filled with Bean boots. ;-)

You know you’re in Maine when the shoe rack in the home is filled with Bean Boots!

 

908, 2014

Backyard Treasures

By |August 9th, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

Green_Heron_Nixon_Park[Green Heron is ALIVE, wild and free roaming. The leopard below is a dead/stuffed display.] leopard_Nixon_Park

I remember when Richard M. Nixon County Park (York Co., PA) was created in the mid 70s but never got around to visiting it …probably because it was so close to home! Funny how that works.

I’m not a big fan of stuffed animal displays and I figured the trails would be pert’ near the same as what I saw behind our house growing up. Actually, we were pleasantly surprised! – and just a few miles away.

Got some good practice using the Fujifilm X-T1 and Fuji’s amazing manual focus peaking.  I also took a lot of photos of the stuffed animals in case I ever needed reference photos for future illustrations.

3107, 2014

Barn painting – colour vrs. b/w

By |July 31st, 2014|Personal, Photography|0 Comments

barn_painting_bw_sm

barn painting_sm

We drove past this scene the other day and I just had to turn around for a photo! Another reason to always have camera at hand. The white shirts against the red barn and all those “fun” primary colours almost made barn painting look enjoyable.

While the white, intense blue, red and green caught my eye initially, I’m still drawn to the b/w version as it cuts out the distraction of colour to reveal a bit more of the shapes and symmetry between the left and right sides.

B/W or colour?  Sometimes I prefer both.

[York New Salem, PA]